Sub-provincial regional income multipliers in the Ontario economy
Read Online
Share

Sub-provincial regional income multipliers in the Ontario economy an input-out approach by A.A Kubursi

  • 171 Want to read
  • ·
  • 79 Currently reading

Published by McMaster University, Dept. of Economics in Hamilton, Ont .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Interindustry economics,
  • Ontario -- Economic conditions

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

SeriesWorking paper series (McMaster University. Dept. of Economics) -- no. 73-04
ContributionsWilliams, James R., 1930-,, George, Peter James.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC117O6 K84
The Physical Object
Pagination27 leaves.
Number of Pages27
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18837251M

Download Sub-provincial regional income multipliers in the Ontario economy

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Ontario Economic Accounts — Quarterly Data, Ontario Gross Domestic Product (Income-Based) Seasonally adjusted data at annual rates, millions of dollars: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4; 1. Compensation of employees (domestic basis) , , , , , , , Sub-provincial regional income multipliers in the Ontario economy: an input-output approach. This paper considers the feasibility of reducing regional income disparities by selective expansion of Author: Kenneth Scheve. Kubursi, A.A., J.R. Williams, and P.J. George. (). "Sub-provincial regional income multipliers in the Ontario economy: an imput-output approach." Canadian Journal of Economics / Revue canadienne d'économique 8, no. 1(February/février): Considers the feasibility of reducing regional disparities by selective expansion of. Labour income ($) comprises the direct, indirect and induced impact in terms of the wages and employment benefits earned by workers. Since wages are paid directly to households in exchange for labour, these households spend their income directly into the regional economy and this money cycles through the economy and has direct.

  The analysis and definition of economic regions at the sub-provincial scale is a neglected policy issue in Canada notwithstanding the severity and persistence of disparities in regional growth. Employment growth in the 30 Economic Regions (ERs) of Western Canada – is partitioned into region and industry-mix effects and the resulting. Regional differences in the pace of population growth and aging will contribute to economic differences across Ontario’s regions. Regional economic growth will also be affected by other factors, including the presence of natural resources and other natural endowments, the mixture of business and industry, and the availability of required skills. Sub-provincial regional income multipliers in the Ontario economy: an input-output approach. This paper considers the feasibility of reducing regional income disparities by selective expansion of.   Provincial Outlook. Quarterly forecasts of the economic prospects for each provincial economy including forecast detail tables and key provincial comparisons.

Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Volume 8. , pp. "Differential Impact of Government Expenditure Programs", Public Finance Quarterly, Volume 3, No. 2, (April, ), pp. (with R. Frank). "Sub-Provincial Regional Income Multipliers in the Ontario Economy: An Input-Output. The Income Distributional Effects of Processing Incentives: A General Equilibrium Analysis pp. David Burgess Measurement of Income Tax Progression in a Growing Economy: The Canadian Experience pp. C. P. Khetan and S. N. Poddar Theorie des marches financiers: une synthese de l'approche moyenne-variance. The income multiplier measures the total increase in income in the local economy resulting from a $1 increase in income received by workers in the exporting industry. Multiplying the initial change in income by the income multiplier for the industry provides an estimate of the increase in income for all.   The future of the Arctic economy must better integrate subsistence harvesting activities with a modern income- and employment-generating sector. The latter needs to be more flexible and accommodating of seasonal variations in the availability of labour and alive to the gradual development of local capacity in business and regional and community.